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the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, they will not give up power. i hear going to have some sort of a renewed dictatorship in the middle east. g
is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible, because it means there will be able to continue to export. as much as they're trying to move from an export driven economy to a more domestic consumption based economy, they will still rely heavily on exports. the more americans are working, the more money they have in their pockets, the more they will be shopping in stores, and so much of what they buy is made from many other countries, including china. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more that china will export. that means jobs for the chinese people. >> when you talk to leaders, how much are they actually were it about united states? -- worried about united states? >> i think united states is incredibly important to china, and recognize that. not only in very practical ways, but in another way, more psychological. there is a 150 year history were china has been trying to check itself up in big shin itself upr status. there is this lingering psychological mindset of china being victimized by the great powers. it is kind of a struggle
. obama welcome to military families to the white house for this season's first u.s. of holiday decorations. the theme is the way to all. the white house christmas tree is decorated by children living on u.s. military bases around the world. the first lady's remarks are about 15 minutes. > [applause] >> hi, everyone. welcome to the white house. prequel, hu? yeah. let me start by thanking jennifer for that lovely introduction and to welcome her family here as well. her father and her husband. we are so grateful for your service and glad you could be here. thank you, jennifer, for everything that you and your family have done for this country and what you have done to make this house as beautiful as it is. as first lady, you know that i have had the privilege of traveling across this country. one of the best things i get to do is to meet with all of the wonderful military families, like jennifer's family and your families. it is an honor to host you all here today at the white house. yeah. the cool house. i like it. i have said this many times before. i will say it again because i
, a discussion on the impact of skilled immigrant labor on the u.s. economy. at 11:00 q&a with crystal wright. there is another chance to see david cameron take questions from the house of commons. >> i don't mean just the channel but the able to find surprises. every month or every year i get some show that people are talking about that i don't think you can have imagined choosing. you could not convince me to choose honey boo boo. or a certain food channel networks. i don't think if i had to predetermine that was my preference i would have ever picked them. but the ability to stumble on them, to hear people talk about them and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you cou
skilled immigrants on the u.s. economy. a panel talks about how immigration laws affects mat scuents. we'll hear from mark warner. hosted by the university of virginia's center this is about an hour and 20 minutes. >> thank you, david. good evening. welcome to the national press club for the keynote round tail. i would like to pay special tribute to mark kaplan whose vision has made this annual conference possible. his commitment to public service has been stead fast through the years and we're grateful for his abiding friendship. i also want to recognize, as david has, the hard work of david, mike, jeff, of the center. who is responsible for convening this group of scholars, poice makers, and key figures from the private sector. as david highlighted this session i should point out that we examined the full spectrum over high skilled immigration in an effort to refrain current thinking about admission policies or highly skilled foreign born workers. experts provide different perspectives on the suggest and discuss the benefits and limitations of current and proposed policies. simply put,
children, but not out of 10 under privilege women in the u.s. lack supplies. many of these families are third-generation of the entitlement recipients in communities across america. in chicago's cook county, it costs $10 million a month to support them. some reports say next year, one half of all children in new york city will be bored to indigent parents. host: your point in all this? caller: my point is, the money that is being spent on these other entitlement programs have to be cut because these people are able to get out of work and make a nice living, whereas the elderly cannot. guest: i think the main thing to pay it to do about the federal budget -- and this is something that people say flippantly some times. at the u.s. government is an insurance company with an army. when we talk about the insurance company part, we are talking about medicare and social security, and to some degree medicaid. those are programs that benefit the middle class and the poor, mainly through retirement. the other thing that people talk about, those are very small parts in the federal budget compa
in the war on terror on u.s. homeland. he was concerned he would not get the time. senator mccain is the ranking member of the armed services committee. he assured him he would not try to block the amendment. alternately, senator dianne feinstein agreed to what senator paul favors. that amendment was approved. >> there were several other notable amendments to the bill. can you tell us about those? >> the iran sanctions amendment would limit the type of materials related to shipping and other things iran does. it is a pretty tough amendment, but not as tough as what the house would prefer to do. that was passed by a large majority. >> senator carl levin and senator john mccain are managing this bill. we understand they hope to finish it in three days. that will not happen. how much more work is there to do? >> is remains to be seen. a lot needs to be sorted out behind the scenes. i do believe they would like to be finished by monday. that is where we are now. >> the house approved its defense authorization bill earlier this year. how does the senate bill differ? >> i was just speak
to think about a senate bill, i do believe in term limits. i guaranteed it in the u.s. house and i will certainly have a certain number of terms. in you start in the middle, where do you go from there? 12 to 14 years from this point is a good number. two full terms would be fantastic. but i better win the first one or the second one doesn't really matter much. [inaudible question] my understanding is january 3. >> [inaudible] what do you think you can accomplish now [inaudible] -- >> i think the first thing that i'll recognize is the south will become the entire capital of the country because i'll be putting more miles on my tires, because now i have two years to represent the entire state and get re-elected by 2014. one of the things i hope we work on from the senate will be the same thing that i worked on in the house, which is when you look at the problems of our country, they are simply spending problems primarily. we cannot address from congress many of the issues and challenges that really affect americans. that's something that starts at home. the things that we can affect i
kay bailey hutchinson is also retiring. she was elected to the u.s. senate in 1993. she served as vice-chairman of the public and conference -- republican conference. she gave her farewell address last week. it is half an hour. >> madame president, i am proud to just this chamber for possibly the last time as a senator from the great state of texas. it is an ironic note that if i had given my farewell address last week, there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capitol, ringing with laughter and anticipation of our season's happiest time. but in one weekend, a sadness has set in with the news of a massacre of innocent children in newtown, connecticut. that was followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator yue.el inoyoue.o i leave with a heavy heart just in the last few days. i want to thank the people of texas for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who have served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say that i am touched that both the benches on both sides of this room are filled with my staff members who have been s
are calling for more u.s. involvement and more u.s. activity. we are meant to believe that approach is being considered now and that has implications turkey and i ran. -- iran. that's all. >> this week prime minister david cameron announced that 3800 troops will be withdrawn from afghanistan by 2013. they doesed concerns over proposed spending cuts. prime minister's questions tonight at 9:30 p.m. on c-span. >> now a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign. this is from today's washington journal. a look back at campaign 2012. joining us at the table is glenn thrush and jonathan martin of politico. guest: we had known that there >> we have known for some time there was always tension between the campaign staff and the candidate's family in terms of how to fill mitt romney's -- how to tell the romney story. so many americans saw this rich business man and they never got a sense for who he was as a person. one of the most fascinating is that we came across was, romney had a mormon documentarian follow him around in the campaign. he was a friend of one of the romney sons. he had great ac
and not half real plan spree did not have -- not have rail plans and. my concern is whether the u.s. has priorities of where to begin and where we would end. what we have seen in the past couple of years is no funding from the federal government. we really comment in some kind of dream of going, some of the state's will continue to move forward because even in the best circumstances as we approach the cliff, in not going over there will be very significant reductions in every kind of program made. that is the case. i need to hear the case for why we would prioritize at least one of the places you have funded that looks like it is ready to go and go with it. if you do not do that, you must have some view that some miracle is going to happen in the economy so at least the public sector will continue funding. i cannot see that. if it is not the case that we can expect public funding for all parts of the country and in next five years. let's take the near term. what do you think is the best way to proceed with what scarce funds you may recede? -- receive? we know this. if you start, we try t
. and david mihalchik, from google's u.s. cloud computing business. he has helped to establish and expand google's cloud computing footprint. he led their efforts to -- and was part of the team that launched google apps. prior, he was a senior manager with accenture. mark, you have had the luxury of being both inside and at the top level thinking about this and implementing it and we have heard about quicksilver and place. where do you see the next 10 years? if we did this in 10 years, we accomplishments, tell us about the technology changes. >> we are at the cusp of a new productivity model for government. i was excited to hear about the discussion of the first panel. there are four key elements. government that information is abundant, open, and nonproprietary. i had an article a few weeks ago that some of you may have seen, the project at m.i.t. we are at a point now where it is not clear about the collection and dissemination of information. you think about the discussion over the unemployment rate and other things. the crisis project, a couple guys with a cluster of servers, $15,000,
, to the manufacturing plants that will return to the u.s. with the lower cost of energy. but we need government to encourage these job opportunities, not continue to block them. a return to sound monetary policy would also help by making the future value of a dollar more predictable. and we must get the cost of health insurance under control. you should be able to get a health care plan that fits your needs and your budget, from any company in america that's willing to sell it to you, and with the same tax benefit if you buy it yourself or have an employer buy it for you. these ideas will help create middle class jobs. but we also have to make sure that our people have the skills to do these new jobs. and a limited government can help by promoting curriculum reform, teacher training and empowering parents with the freedom to choose their kids' school. our tax code should reward education investments the same way companies are encouraged to invest in equipment. let's encourage career, technical and vocational education, stop discriminating against online courses, encourage skill development that
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13